The University of Arizona
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CAROLYN ANNE CAMPBELL

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Birth Date: 1958
Birth Place: Coronado, California

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Date submitted: October 24, 2006
Gift: Arch with Seating
Location on plaza map: A2
Areas of Achievement: Activism, Community Building, Education, Politics, Volunteer
 
Carolyn Campbell was nominated for the Amazon Foundation's Women Activists Arch in the Women's Plaza of Honor by the Tucson Audubon Society.

"Carolyn has been a leader in environmental issues in Arizona for over 25 years. She began her tenure as an aide to Morris K. Udall where she assisted him in constituent services. She is an active member of the Green Party and has worked to gain support for politicians whose campaign platforms center on issues of social justice and the environment. Recent campaigns she has worked on include Richard Elias, Pima County Board of Supervisors and Raul Grijalva, Member, U.S, House of Representatives.

In addition to her work with specific candidates, Carolyn has tirelessly advocated for increased voter participation. To this end, she is a member of the Board of Directors of the Arizona League of Conservation Voter's Education Fund. She has worked to create protected area status for the Sonoran Desert's pristine natural areas, most notably through the establishment of the Ironwood and Sonoran National Monuments.

Carolyn is currently working to bring diverse stakeholders to the table to work towards community consensus around the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan. This multi-species habitat conservation plan has won national planning awards for its attempt to unify diverse groups (i.e. environmentalists, ranchers, private property rights advocates, and developers) for a common cause. Carolyn has been a key player. For the past four years she has worked with these interest groups to generate consensus. As the SDCP process comes to a close, Carolyn can be credited with much of its success.

Carolyn is a leader in the environmental movement and she is a positive example for women. She has mentored many university students and she frequently speaks about her work to diverse audiences." --Tucson Audubon Society